Record Book – West Indies’ highest successful ODI chases

  The fourth game of the ongoing Ireland Tri-Series saw the West Indies chase down a target of 328 against hosts Ireland at The Village in Malahide to complete a five-wicket win. Leading the way was Sunil Ambris, who struck 148, his first ODI hundred, to help the Windies record their highest successful ODI chase – only once before had the Caribbean outfit chased down a target of over 300 to win an ODI.

  On that note, here is a look at the West Indies’ six highest successful ODI chases.

331/5 (target 328) v Ireland, Fourth ODI, Ireland Tri-Series, Dublin, 2019

  After Ireland rode on Andrew Balbirnie’s 135 to post 327/5, the West Indies were given a brisk start by openers Shai Hope and Ambris, who put on 84. Ambris further added 128 with Roston Chase for the third wicket, and went on to score 148 in 126 balls before being fourth out at 252. Jonathan Carter and captain Jason Holder put the finishing touches, and the target was overhauled with 13 balls still remaining.

309/6 (target 309) v Pakistan, First ODI, Providence, 2016-17

  This was the first time that the West Indies successfully chased down more than 300 in an ODI. Ewin Lewis (47) and Kieran Powell (61) built the innings after Pakistan totalled 308/5, but at 158/4 in the 34th over, the Windies were in dire need of acceleration. It was Jason Mohammed who did the star turn, as he smashed an unbeaten 91 in just 58 balls to ensure a West Indian triumph with a full over left.  

WI v Pak, 2016-17

     Jason Mohammed (91* in 58 balls) and Ashley Nurse (34* in 15) rejoice after their stand of 50* helped the Windies beat Pakistan at Providence in 2016-17 (source – cricket.com.au)

300/3 (target 298) v South Africa, Fourth ODI, Centurion, 2003-04

  In stark contrast to their batting failures in the first three matches of this five-ODI series, the West Indies produced a quality display to hunt down South Africa’s total of 297/4 in just 45 overs. Shivnarine Chanderpaul blitzed 92 in 75 balls as opener, and added 108 for the third wicket with Ramnaresh Sarwan (77*). Sarwan in turn shared a rapid stand of 100* with captain Brian Lara, whose 59* took only 37 balls.

292/6 (target 292) v New Zealand, Fifth ODI, Kingstown, 2002

  The hosts sealed the five-match series by a margin of 3-1 after a remarkable finish to this final ODI. Replying to New Zealand’s 291/8, Chris Gayle set the tone with a well-paced 67. Lara (47), captain Carl Hooper (45) and Sarwan (52) all contributed, before Gayle’s fellow opener Chanderpaul, having retired hurt earlier, returned. With 13 to win in four balls, Chanderpaul hit 4,4,4,1 to hand the Windies victory

291/5 (target 291) v India, Fifth ODI, Vadodara, 2002-03

  The seven-match series was locked at 2-2 coming into this fifth ODI, which was reduced to a 48-over affair. In pursuit of India’s 290/8, Gayle and Wavell Hinds ran up a ferocious opening stand of 132 at over eight runs an over. While Hinds fell for a 61-ball 80, Gayle proceeded to reach 101. After a brief middle-order wobble, Ricardo Powell and Hooper saw the West Indies home with seven balls to spare.  

290/6 (target 290) v Zimbabwe, World Cup Qualifier Super Six, Harare, 2017-18

  The West Indies prevailed in what was a crunch Super Six clash of the World Cup Qualifier, thus keeping their march towards qualification for the 2019 World Cup on track. Brendan Taylor’s 138 boosted Zimbabwe to 289, but meaty knocks from Ewin Lewis (64), Shai Hope (76) and Marlon Samuels (86) saw to it that the Windies maintained the edge. The win was duly secured off the last ball of the 49th over. 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Record Book – West Indies’ highest successful ODI chases

Leave a Reply to Rustom Deboo Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s